How Callmaker Uses Integrations to Lower Churn

Callmaker is a SaaS company which helps companies get more inbound sales calls by adding a “Get a Call” button to their customer’s websites. When visitors click the button and input their phone number they get a callback from the company, generally within 25 seconds. For companies who integrate them, Callmaker increases call volume by 10-50%. I spoke with Callmaker’s founder Pavel Myakov about their integration strategy.

This is a post about how they use integrations, but for Callmaker, growth doesn’t come from integrations, it comes from more traditional channels like paid ads and direct sales.

As Pavel describes it: “There are companies make popups for email subscription. Their software can be used by a wide range of customers, including really small businesses. In this case, I think an integration can be a great marketing channel (if you are making something really simple for a wide audience). But, If you are making something for a narrower channel use the integrations to decrease churn and increase usage.”

If you are making something for a narrower channel use the integrations to decrease churn and increase usage.

In other words, for a narrow market like theirs, it’s more effective to use integrations as a way of making their customers happier than as a way of attracting new leads: “When customers use our integration, they are using our product more. When a customer integrates Callmaker with their CRM they see their call history every time they use their CRM. They end up seeing the impact of our product, and visiting it, much more often. We’re using integrations not to acquire users, but to increase the Lifetime Value of our customers.”

Customers who integrate are more likely to stick around, and they’re more likely to use the product more often. If the customer gets Callmaker record info in their CRM they’ll end up seeing and using Callmaker more justifying the expense when the bill comes around. It’s an increasingly appreciated fact that often the customers who churn are the ones who don’t use the product regularily. Get them to use it and they’ll stay.

It’s an increasingly appreciated fact that often the customers who churn are the ones who don’t use the product regularily. Get them to use it and they’ll stay.

How do they choose which integrations to build? It’s not just about what makes logical sense, it’s also about what will increase usage: “The first factor is what our customers are asking for. The second factor is trying to guess what kind of integrations are most likely to increase the usage of our product.”

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